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5.4 is out!

Posted by Stas on March 5, 2012

Since May 2011 we have worked on releasing PHP 5.4, and now it happened. Thanks everybody who helped with it!

PHP 5.4 has some new and exciting features – for some of them, like traits, I have no idea right now how they will work out and what people would do with them. It’d be very interesting to see.
For some of them, I feel they are basic common sense and long overdue in PHP (of course, not everybody may share my opinion ;) – like ['short','array','syntax'] or detaching <?= from INI settings. Some were just missing features that we didn’t catch up with before – more fluent syntax, linking objects to closures, etc.
Some things in PHP, as we have come to realize, were clearly mistakes – like register_globals, some were driven by real needs but proved to do more harm than good at the end – like magic quotes and “safe” mode – so we had to lay them to rest.

One of the best things that happened in 5.4 though is not immediately apparent. The engine behind 5.4 is significantly faster and consumes less memory than before. How much faster and how much less? Depends on your application, of course, but from some benchmarks 10-20% speed improvement and 20-30% memory improvement can be expected. Do your own benchmarks and blog about the results! Also would be a good time to ensure your application runs fine on 5.4 – since 5.4 is now the stable version and you have to start using it! :)

Another great things that happened – and is continuing to happen – is that we are finally moving towards more streamlined release process, towards having more regular releases (expect 5.4.1 release cycle to start in late March-early April and 5.4.1 be out in about a month after that) and more organized feature/change proposal process. There’s a wiki where people can post their RFC proposals, we have a voting process and while we may be still working out some fine details of the procedure, I feel we definitely have improved in this regard. It is time to get some organization into the process – we don’t need to create a bureaucracy, but some process is definitely needed and we’re establishing it.

Yet another thing that is happening – PHP project is slowly but surely moving from SVN to Git. This will be a great improvement. Having used Git for the last couple of years, I can clearly see that it can make many things we’re doing in PHP everyday so much easier. Can’t wait for it :) Also makes easy for people to do pull requests and for core devs to merge them, among other things – should make bug resolutions, etc. work faster.

And after catching our breaths a bit and relaxing soon there will be time to think what we do in 5.5 – remember the thing about more regular releases? :) I’ll try to post some thoughts about what I’d want in 5.5 soon.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , | 5 Comments »

Shortcuts

Posted by Stas on August 3, 2011

Being at OSCON, I’ve attended one good talk about Python oddities, which got me thinking about language syntax in general.

PHP is notorious among scripting languages for it’s verbose syntax – you have to spell out many things that are much shorter in other languages. Some people think it’s very bad that they can’t be “expressive”, meaning writing more clever code with less keystrokes. Sometimes they are right, sometimes they are not. Let’s consider two examples:

From PHP: 5.4 has a new array syntax: ['foo', 'bar'] which is the same as array('foo', bar').

I think it’s a good shortcut – because [] is a common expression for arrays (or structures that work like PHP arrays) in many languages, and it is obvious for most people how it works.

What’s an example a shortcut that isn’t good? Python (version 2) has this syntax for exception handling (this was one of the examples in the talk):

except Foo, Bar:

Now what this means: are we catching two exception types, Foo and Bar, or are we catching exception Foo and assigning it to Bar? The correct answer is the latter – it’s exception Foo assigned to Bar. I think it’s bad shortcut – because it uses a comma – which is common expression for lists and enumeration – to separate the type and the parameter. This leads to people writing things like “except KeyError, IndexError” which doesn’t do what one would expect to.

Pyhton people seem to agree with me, as in Python 3 the syntax has been changed to:

except Foo as Bar:

One could argue it’s not as “expressive” and more verbose – bu it’s definitely much more readable and would lead to less broken code. It’d be even better if they used the word “exception” or try/catch as all the rest of the world does :)

Some people in PHP community think all “shortcuts” are best to be avoided. I think some of them could be useful, provided clarity is not sacrificed and there’s not “too much magic”. I know it’s subjective but my personal criteria is that if it’s not immediately clear what’s going on for a person with reasonable knowledge of the matter – it’s probably too much magic.

Posted in Engine, PHP | 5 Comments »

On PHP features

Posted by Stas on December 25, 2010

When people ask why PHP doesn’t have this or that cool feature which allows to do some tricky mind-bending function and requires a dozen pages of manual to describe it, I find this quote from Brian W. Kernighan is very appropriate:

Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it.

Corollary of that is that some clever tricks are better left not done and some cool things may not look that cool when you have to deal with the consequences.

That being said, I think there are many cool things yet to be done in PHP. So, I’ve posted a poll on Programmers.StackExchange site about what people want to see in PHP. I know people regularly post on PHP lists about that, etc. but I think SE crowd would be somewhat different from what is found on PHP internal lists, so it would be interesting to see what people’s wishlists for PHP are.

If you happen to want to add your 2c there or just vote on stuff – feel welcome. Absolutely no promises it would have any weight, influence anything (except maybe my own opinion about what people want in PHP), etc. of course.

 

Posted in Engine, PHP | 3 Comments »

hiphop for php

Posted by Stas on February 3, 2010

By now probably everybody that is connected to PHP world knows about Facebook’s HipHop.
So here are my thoughts about it.

1. This is a very cool and exciting technology. There were multiple attempts to do this in various ways, and from what it looks, HipHop is the most successful and appealing. I know doing these things is not easy – I tried something like that myself somewhere back in 2006 but was unable to go past very basic examples (I also made a mistake of choosing C instead of C++ as target, which I now think was not a smart decision). And the progress and support for almost all of the PHP magic is definitely great. There still are unsupported areas, but mostly are dark corners into which not many people venture (or should venture, at least :)

2. I do not see it as a replacement for php.net code or Zend Engine. The mainstream of PHP development still happens in the community around php.net and I do not think it is going to change anytime soon. I also see the fact that HipHop engine basically re-implements all the extensions as a serious disadvantage, for which the solution should be sought, even though I completely understand the technical reasons for doing so. I do not know which kind of the solution but while for the company like Facebook it might be OK to “freeze” certain set of extensions and features and maybe catch up periodically, I think it is obvious how such model can be a problem for the wider adoption.

3. If we talk about broader adoption of this technology in a wider PHP world, there are some serious challenges to consider:

  • Plugins: right now, you must compile your whole application. However, many real-life applications have extensive plugin models, which consist of their main competitive advantage – take WordPress, Drupal, Magento, any Zend Framework app – all of these allow to write custom plugins and run them alongside the main code base. The model in which you have to rebuild whole application each time you add/change a line of code is not acceptable in these circumstances.
  • Modularity: this is connected to the above, but is a bit different. PHP right now runs on Apache, IIS, Lighty, nginx, and tons of other servers in different environments. For the use of the technology in the wide variety of environments PHP is used in, one must be able to modularize  and separate the application PHP code from the runtime and the environment.
  • Portability: I tried to run a bunch of my scripts through the demo that the HipHop team was very kind to give me – and most of them experiences unsupported functions or some function didn’t work exactly as their PHP counterparts (random example: PHP’s fopen() would error out given empty first argument, while HPHP implementation would open the current directory as file. There are more such things…). Now, I admit, it would be very easy to fix them, to use different functions and they would work, but again I think it’s obvious how it can be a problem for a PHP programmer, if you are not coding targeting HipHop specifically – and especially of you use 3rd-party code. Having different implementations always presents portability challenges.
  • Thread-safety: A huge problem with PHP thread-safety is third-party libraries. Many of them are not thread safe either explicitly, or, even worse, implicitly – i.e. they just have either bugs or information leaks between threads (like changing some setting in one thread and feeling its effect in another – imagine chdir() leaking through the thread boundaries – see how it can be a problem?) HipHop team’s answer to this question was “we had fixed all those extensions” – which, without diminishing the capabilities of this excellent team, I think is not a satisfactory answer. It very well may be that they indeed fixed all the problems they could see in the code they run – but let us not forget they run one (albeit huge) application. I have hard time believing they have fixed every threading problem with every C library in existence that has interface to PHP and will continue to do so as long as C libraries exist. This of course goes back to modularity question, since here we have coupling between compiling and runtime model.
  • Debugging: obviously, debugging C++ code is orders of magnitude harder than PHP code. So you either need ninja debugging skills, or a very good set of tools to allow you to identify a problem in a live server running non-source PHP.

4. I also see certain danger potential in the success of this project. The danger primary being that the performance is very important in the web world, and it can give an incentive to the PHP community to change PHP in ways that may be better for performance, but would make PHP into being an entirely different language. The obvious example of this is strict typing – strict typing, of course, would help the compiler a lot in figuring out what’s going on with the code. However, I am not convinced at all that it would make the life of a PHP programmer easier. I know there are a number of proponents of this but I am still not convinced it’s the way for PHP to go. And there might be other incentives like this – i.e. to add or drop features to PHP, or avoid using certain constructs and features, for the sole reason of making it more compile-able. Now, there’s nothing wrong with being compiler-friendly, but I don’t think for a language like PHP it should be the primary motivation.

Re-reading these notes I realized some of it might give an impression that I dislike the technology. It is absolutely not so – on the contrary, I think it is a great addition to the PHP world and I want again to congratulate the HipHop team on a huge achievement and thank them for making the PHP world better and more exciting. It would be very interesting to see how this develops and how and if the problems can be overcome and how this technology changes the PHP world and is changed by it.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , , , , | 8 Comments »

5.2->5.3 migration script

Posted by Stas on January 25, 2010

Wrote an article on DevZone about migration script from php 5.2 to 5.3. This little script can save some time when you consider to move your codebase to run under 5.3 (which you should :) ).

This script doesn’t do everything I’d like it to do – specifically, I’d like to make it try to figure out all kinds of messy reference scenarios, but I’m not sure how yet. And if you have other idea, please comment there or here. It’s on public git, so you can take it and modify if you wish.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

syntax I miss in PHP

Posted by Stas on August 21, 2009

Here are some syntax additions I’d like to see in PHP:

1. a()()
When a() returns a callable object (such as a closure) the second set of brackets would call it. That would allow to write some neat code. I am working on a patch for that but it’s a bit harder than I thought.

2. a()[$x]
This is kind of obvious, I wonder why don’t we have it? Should also be able to be an lvalue, though unless a() returns by-ref or return value is an object it may not do what one wanted.

3. foo(1,2,,4)
Syntax to skip a parameter in a call, which then will be substituted with the default as defined by the function. Would come handy if you have function with many defaults, and you only want to change the last one but leave the rest alone – now you don’t have to look up the actual default’s values.

4. foo(“a” => 1, “c” => 2, “d” => 4)
Named parameters call, which allows you to specify parameters in arbitrary order by name. Would allow to build nice APIs which could accept wider ranges of parameters without resorting to using arrays. That’d also imply call_user_func_array() would accept named arguments.
The problem here might be what to do with unknown arguments – i.e. ones that the function did not expect. I guess the function could just ignore them.

5. $a = ["a", "b" => "c"];
I’d really like to have short array syntax. Yes, I know it was rejected so many times already, but I still like it.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , | 64 Comments »

5.3!!!

Posted by Stas on June 30, 2009

After a long string of delays, PHP 5.3 is finally out.  On the course of last 2 years, I was pretty sure a number of times that it will happen next month the latest, but there always were good reasons to postpone it. Now finally it’s officially out. I think it’s a huge step for PHP. Download it and try it!

Some major new features in 5.3:

  1. Namespaces! They didn’t end up exactly as I thought they would but they are a major feature PHP was missing for a long time, and I’m very curious to see how it works out in big projects.
  2. Closures and anonymous functions! PHP now has first-class functions, and you can do all kinds of crazy stuff with it. Or just make your code easier to read and maintain :)
  3. Garbage collection. PHP engine, being refcount-based, always has had a slight problem with reference loops. Even though usually it was not a big issue since at the end of the request everything is cleaned up, for long-running PHP applications not based on short request pattern it became a problem. Not anymore – now the engine knows to clean up such loops.
  4. Late static binding – it’s somewhat exotic thing for people that never encountered it, but was very burning issue for people that did need it. Basically, when class Foo extends class Bar, and the method func() defined in Foo is called as Bar::func(), there was no way to distinguish it from Foo::func(). Now there is. This allows to implement all kinds of cool patterns like ActiveRecord.
  5. Intl extension in core – lots of functions to allow you to internationalize your application.
  6. Phar in core – now you can pack all the application in one neat file and still be able to run it!

Also in 5.3:

  1. Nowdocs – same as heredocs, but doesn’t parse variables. Excellent feature for somebody that wants to include bing chunk of text into the script which can happen to have $’s etc. in it.
  2. ?: shortcut. That’s simple – $a?:$b is $a if $a is true, otherwise it’s $b.
  3. goto. Yes, I know. But now we have it too. Deal with it. :)
  4. mysqlnd – native PHP-specific mysql driver.

Last but definitely not least – tons of performance improvements, bug fixes, etc. Download it today! :)

Posted in Engine, Functions, PHP | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

PHP performance tips from Google

Posted by Stas on June 26, 2009

I saw a link on twitter referring to PHP optimization advice from Google. There are a bunch of advices there, some of them are quite sound, if not new – like use latest versions if possible, profile your code, cache whatever can be cached, etc. Some are of doubtful value – like the output buffering one, which could be useful in some situations but do nothing or be worse in others, and if you’re a beginner generally it’s better for you to leave it alone until you’ve solved the real performance problems.

However some of the advices make no sense at best and are potentially harmful at worst. Let’s get to it:

First one: Don’t copy variables for no reason. I don’t know what the author intended to describe there, but PHP engine is refcounting copy-on-write, and there’s absolutely no copying going on when assigning variables as they described it:

$description = strip_tags($_POST['description']);
echo $description;

I don’t know where it comes from but it’s just not so, unless maybe in some prehistoric version of PHP. Which means unless you’re going back to 1997 in a time machine this advice is no good for you.

Next one: Avoid doing SQL queries within a loop. This actually might make sense in some situations, however the code examples they give there is missing one important detail that makes it potentially harmful for beginners (see if you can spot it):

$userData = [];
foreach ($userList as $user) {
$userData[] = '("' . $user['first_name'] . '", "' . $user['last_name'] . '")';
}
$query = 'INSERT INTO users (first_name,last_name) VALUES' . implode(',', $userData);
mysql_query($query);

Please repeat after me – DO NOT INSERT USER DATA INTO SQL WITHOUT SANITIZING IT!
Of course, I can not know that $user was not sanitized. Maybe the intent was that it was. But if you give such example and target beginners, you should say so explicitly, every time! People tend to copy/paste examples, and then you get SQL injection in a government site.

Another thing: most of real-life PHP applications usually do not insert data in bulk, except for some very special scenarios (bulk data imports, etc.) – so actually in most cases one would be better off using PDO and prepared statements. Or some higher-level frameworks which will do it for you. But if you roll your own SQL – sanitize the data! This is much more important than any performance tricks.

Next one: Use single-quotes for long strings. PHP code is parsed and compiled, and any possible difference in speed between parsing “” and ” is really negligible unless you operate with hundreds of megabyte-size strings embedded in your code. If you do so, your quotes probably aren’t where you should start optimizing. And of course, using caching (see below) eliminates this difference altogether.

Next one: Use switch/case instead of if/else. This makes no sense since switch does essentially the same things as if’s do. See for yourself, here is the “if” code:

0       2     A(0) = FETCH_R(C("_POST")) [global]
1       2     A(1) = FETCH_DIM_R(A(0), C("action")) [Standard]
2       2     T(2) = IS_EQUAL(A(1), C("add"))
3       2     JMPZ(T(2), 7)
4       3     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("addUser"))
5       3     Au(3) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
6       4     JMP(16)
7       4     A(4) = FETCH_R(C("_POST")) [global]
8       4     A(5) = FETCH_DIM_R(A(4), C("action")) [Standard]
9       4     T(6) = IS_EQUAL(A(5), C("delete"))
10      4     JMPZ(T(6), 14)
11      5     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("deleteUser"))
12      5     Au(7) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
13      6     JMP(16)
14      7     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("defaultAction"))
15      7     Au(8) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
16      9     RETURN(C(1))
17      9     HANDLE_EXCEPTION()

Here is the “switch” code:

0       2     A(0) = FETCH_R(C("_POST")) [global]
1       2     A(1) = FETCH_DIM_R(A(0), C("action")) [Standard]
2       3     T(2) = CASE(A(1), C("add"))
3       3     JMPZ(T(2), 8 )
4       4     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("addUser"))
5       4     Au(3) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
6       5     BRK(0, C(1))
7       6     JMP(10)
8       6     T(2) = CASE(A(1), C("delete"))
9       6     JMPZ(T(2), 14)
10      7     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("deleteUser"))
11      7     Au(4) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
12      8     BRK(0, C(1))
13      9     JMP(15)
14      9     JMP(19)
15     10     INIT_FCALL_BY_NAME(function_table, C("defaultAction"))
16     10     Au(5) = DO_FCALL_BY_NAME() [0 arguments]
17     11     BRK(0, C(1))
18     12     JMP(20)
19     12     JMP(15)
20     12     SWITCH_FREE(A(1))
21     13     RETURN(C(1))
22     13     HANDLE_EXCEPTION()
No.     CONT    BRK     Parent
0         20          20           -1

You can see there’s a little difference – the latter has CASE/BRK opcodes, which act more or less like IS_EQUAL and JMP, but their plumbing is a bit different, but in general, code is the same (you could even argue “switch” code is a bit less optimal, but that is really the area you shouldn’t be concerned with before you can read and understand the code in zend_vm_def.h – which is not exactly a beginner stuff.

Another thing that the author absolutely failed to mention and which should be one of the very first things anybody who cares about performance should do – is to use a bytecode cache. There are plenty of free ones (shameless plug: Zend Server CE includes one of them – all the performance improvements for $0 :) and you don’t have to change a bit of code to run it.

Now, I understand Google is not a PHP shop like Yahoo or Facebook or many others. But this article is signed “Eric Higgins, Google Webmaster” and one would expect something much more sound from such source. And in fact there are a lot of blogs and conference talks on the topic and lots of community folks around that I am sure would be ready to help with such article – I wonder why wasn’t it done? Why apparently the best advice we can find from Google is either trivial or useless or wrong?

I think they can do much better, and they should if they take “making the web faster” seriously.

P.S. After having all this written, I also found a comment from Gwynne Raskind, which I advise to read too.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , , , | 54 Comments »

Y-Combinator in PHP

Posted by Stas on April 13, 2009

Since PHP 5.3 now has closures, all things that other languages with closures do should also be possible. One of them is having recursive closures. I.e. something like this:

$factorial = function($n) {
   if ($n <= 1)
     return 1;
   else
     return $n call_user_func(__FUNCTION__$n 1);
};

which does not work. One of the ways to do it is to use Y combinator function, which allows, by application of dark magic and friendly spirits from other dimensions, to convert non-recursive code to recursive code. In PHP, Y combinator function would look like this:

function Y($F) {
    $func =  function ($f) { return $f($f); };
    return $func(function ($f) use($F) {
            return $F(function ($x) use($f) {
            $ff $f($f);
            return $ff($x);
        });
    });
}

And then the factorial function would be:

$factorial Y(function($fact) {
    return function($n) use($fact) {
        return ($n <= 1)?1:$n*$fact($n-1);
    };
});

Which does work:

var_dump($factorial(6)); ==> int(720)

Of course, we could also cheat and go this way:

$factorial = function($n) use (&$factorial) {
      if ($n <= 1)
        return 1;
      else
        return $n $factorial($n 1);
};

Doing Y-combinator in PHP was attempted before (and here), but now I think it works better. It could be even nicer if PHP syntax allowed chaining function invocations – ($foo($bar))($baz) – but for now it doesn’t.

If you wonder, using such techniques does have legitimate applications, though I’m not sure if doing it in PHP this way is worth the trouble.

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , , , | 15 Comments »

5.3!

Posted by Stas on August 2, 2008

The PHP 5.3 release process has officially started with alpha1. Which hopefully means we’d have release in about 2-3 monthes.

This 5.3 release has two huge features that I think will have big influence on the future of PHP – namespaces and closures. There’s also late static binding, which allows to do all kinds of cool tricks, new cool extensions, new faster re2c-based parser, and many other smaller improvements.

Big thanks to everyone who helped to create it, provided feedback, helped with tests, documentation, etc. I think this version will be very successful. And separate thanks to Lukas who made this release from “erm… sometime soon” into “full speed ahead”!

Posted in Engine, PHP | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

 
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