PHP 5.4 – looking back

With 5.6.0 having been released and 5.4 branch nearing its well-earned retirement in security-fixes-only status I decided to try and revive this blog. As the last post before the long hiatus was about the release of the 5.4, I think it makes sense to look back and see how 5.4 has been doing so far.

Great

Release process. Combined with RFCs and git. It’s hard to believe we used not to have it. RFC process is working great, git makes all the processes tick and we have scheduled releases, working CI setup and much better predictability and management of releases overall. It’s no big deal unless you remember how it was before.

Built-in webserver. It really helps when you can just set up something browseable (is this a word? now it is) with PHP alone, without bothering with Apache setup and other moving parts. This is again a case of something that you don’t realize how much you missed it until you start using it.

$this support in closures. Having to write 5.3-compatible code for the last couple of years, I can’t emphasize enough how sorely it was missing in 5.3. I really regret the fact we could not get it into 5.3.

Syntax sugar like [] and <?= working everywhere. It’s a small thing but it adds up. I usually do not give much weight to saving couple of keystrokes and so on, but these to me really improve coder’s quality of life.

Removal of old “features” (since they ended up in the dump, is it right to call them features anymore?). Nobody is missing the safe mode or magic quotes or register_globals. Good riddance. Wish we parted ways sooner.

Meh

Traits. I must say I haven’t seen big adoption of the traits feature. Yes, of course people use it, there are tutorials, there are articles, etc. But at the same time compared to how much namespaces were needed or how much closures proved to be a great help, traits adoption, IMHO, remains lukewarm at best. To me, it has not lived yet up to its promise. Maybe I’m missing something, tell me if you have great examples there.

Adoption. This is a problem for new PHP versions and for developers of distributable PHP software – PHP versions are becoming “good enough” and people are reluctant to move forward, which also delays adoption of new features by library & packaged software writers. Look at the numbers: almost 3/4 of the PHP developers are using EOLed versions! 5.4 adoption is low at 22% and 5.5 adoption is abysmal. I hope that more streamlined release cycles and heightened attention to BC matters would bend this tendency. But so far it is not encouraging. WordPress numbers look even worse.

Don’t know

callable type. How wide is the usage? How useful it is in practice? Is it being used in major projects? I really don’t know.

Performance. It feels weird to put an obviously great improvement in this category. I would expect performance be a major driver for people to move forward, but the numbers suggest otherwise. As much as I love the performance improvements (a lot!), I really have no idea on how much it influenced the community and made them go to 5.4 (or beyond). Are there any surveys, links, studies, etc. in this regard? I see a lot of talk about performance but how many people also walk the walk? Are the numbers quoted above misleading?

mysqlnd. 5.4 is the first version where mysqlnd is the default mode of doing mysql. It has better performance, great features and I’ve been using it for years without a problem. But how widely it is adopted – do people still prefer the old way or love the new one? Do they use the plugin API widely?

Anything else?

Did I forget to mention something that really made your life better in 5.4? Did I conceal some flop that you wish we didn’t do? Please tell.

8 thoughts on “PHP 5.4 – looking back

  1. Pingback: Stanislav Malyshev: PHP 5.4 (Looking Back) & 5.6 (Looking Forward) | facebooklikes

  2. Speaking for my company, our slow adoption of recent versions of PHP has had nothing to do with our deployed version being good enough, it’s all down to which version ships in Ubuntu LTS. I was really disappointed that 5.4 didn’t make it into Ubuntu 12.04 because we’re only now starting to consider migrating to PHP 5.5 with Ubuntu 14.04. That in itself would be a bit disappointing if PHP 5.6 weren’t a bit boring.

      • I think performance improvements alone provide quite a case, but there are also syntax additions that look pretty good. Again, a lot of attention was paid to make the risk much less.

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